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Posts tagged: google

gawkertv:

Listen to Real Housewife Kim Zolciak’s New Song “Google Me”
[via Gawker.TV]

gawkertv:

Listen to Real Housewife Kim Zolciak’s New Song “Google Me”

[via Gawker.TV]

(Source: uglysuzuki)

/Reblogged from
High-res Notes: 5 9/14/10, 10:27pm Short URL: http://tmblr.co/ZHQeKy130d9o Filed under: #google 
A near-term future in which you don’t forget anything, because the computer remembers. You’re never lost.

- Eric Schmidt, Google CEO, during a keynote at the IFA in Berlin

http://techcrunch.com/2010/09/07/eric-schmidt-ifa/

"Uh huh. Google takes a similarly generous view of its own motives on the politically vexed issue of privacy. Mr. Schmidt says regulation is unnecessary because Google faces such strong incentives to treat its users right, since they will walk away the minute Google does anything with their personal information they find "creepy."


Really? Some might be skeptical that a user with, say, a thousand photos on Picasa would find it so easy to walk away. Or a guy with 10 years of emails on Gmail. Or a small business owner who has come to rely on Google Docs as an alternative to Microsoft Office. Isn’t stickiness—even slightly extortionate stickiness—what these Google services aim for?


Mr. Schmidt is surely right, though, that the questions go far beyond Google. “I don’t believe society understands what happens when everything is available, knowable and recorded by everyone all the time,” he says. He predicts, apparently seriously, that every young person one day will be entitled automatically to change his or her name on reaching adulthood in order to disown youthful hijinks stored on their friends’ social media sites.”

from Wall Street Journal interview with Eric Schmidt, “Google and the Search for the Future”

"Much of the discussion of Mr. Schmidt’s interview centered on another comment: his suggestion that young people who catastrophically expose their private lives via social networking sites might need to be granted a name change and a fresh identity as adults. This, interestingly, is a matter of Google letting societal chips fall where they may, to be tidied by lawmakers and legislation as best they can, while the erection of new world architecture continues apace.


If Google were sufficiently concerned about this, perhaps the company should issue children with free “training wheels” identities at birth, terminating at the age of majority. One could then either opt to connect one’s adult identity to one’s childhood identity, or not. Childhoodlessness, being obviously suspect on a résumé, would give birth to an industry providing faux adolescences, expensively retro-inserted, the creation of which would gainfully employ a great many writers of fiction. So there would be a silver lining of sorts.”

-from William Gibson’s NYT’s op-ed “Google’s Earth”

via DCpierson

Stick Figure News: Is Google Being Evil?

by natedern

dangurewitch:

With Gmail’s new toolbar redesign, ignoring Google Buzz is easier than ever! The colorful icon is a helpful reminder not to click, and its placement between “Inbox” and “Sent Mail” makes your mouse’s apathetic trip over the top of the word “Buzz” so convenient, it’ll almost be like you considered using it. But you didn’t! All thanks to this streamlined new interface.

dangurewitch:

With Gmail’s new toolbar redesign, ignoring Google Buzz is easier than ever! The colorful icon is a helpful reminder not to click, and its placement between “Inbox” and “Sent Mail” makes your mouse’s apathetic trip over the top of the word “Buzz” so convenient, it’ll almost be like you considered using it. But you didn’t! All thanks to this streamlined new interface.

"Compare Monday’s statement to this one, from a post on Google’s official blog in 2007: ‘The nation’s spectrum airwaves are not the birthright of any one company. They are a unique and valuable public resource that belong to all Americans. The FCC’s auction rules are designed to allow U.S. consumers — for the first time — to use their handsets with any network they desire, and and [sic] use the lawful software applications of their choice.’

[…]

It no longer made financial sense for Google to fight the carriers with its own open phone hardware, even though that meant abandoning its open wireless principles. In retrospect, they may have never actually been principles — just an aborted marketing strategy that proved unnecessary.

[…]

Mobile openness is the tool of the outsider, not the incumbent. Google is now registering some 200,000 Android handsets every day. Phone-to-phone, Android is now outselling the iPhone. Google doesn’t need openness anymore.”

Some will claim this announcement moves the discussion forward. That’s one of its many problems. It is time to move a decision forward—a decision to reassert FCC authority over broadband telecommunications, to guarantee an open Internet now and forever, and to put the interests of consumers in front of the interests of giant corporations.
FCC Commissioner Michael Copps’ one paragraph statement on the Verizon-Google announcement.

What Google and Verizon are proposing is fake Net Neutrality. […] But here are the basics of what the two companies are proposing:

1. Under their proposal, there would be no Net Neutrality on wireless networks — meaning anything goes, from blocking websites and applications to pay-for-priority treatment.

2. Their proposed standard for “non-discrimination” on wired networks is so weak that actions like Comcast’s widely denounced blocking of BitTorrent would be allowed.

3. The deal would let ISPs like Verizon — instead of Internet users like you — decide which applications deserve the best quality of service. That’s not the way the Internet has ever worked, and it threatens to close the door on tomorrow’s innovative applications. (If RealPlayer had been favored a few years ago, would we ever have gotten YouTube?)

4. The deal would allow ISPs to effectively split the Internet into “two pipes” — one of which would be reserved for “managed services,” a pay-for-play platform for content and applications. This is the proverbial toll road on the information superhighway, a fast lane reserved for the select few, while the rest of us are stuck on the cyber-equivalent of a winding dirt road.

5. The pact proposes to turn the Federal Communications Commission into a toothless watchdog, left fruitlessly chasing consumer complaints but unable to make rules of its own. Instead, it would leave it up to unaccountable (and almost surely industry-controlled) third parties to decide what the rules should be.

via Huffington Post article, "Google Verizon Pact: It Gets Worse", August 9th 2010